Marojejy

One of Madagascar's finest parks, Marojejy was devastated by illegal rosewood logging in 2009. However the park has reopened and retains its spectacular biodiversity and scenery.

Marojejy.com is the leading resource on Marojejy (sometimes called Marojevy).

Province: Antsiranana (Diégo-Suarez)

Area: 60,050

Protected area status: National park

Year established: 1952

General location: Northeastern

Location and Access: 67 km west of Sambava and 50 km north of Andapa

Climate: Tropical to high elevation climate

Average temperature: 22-25°C

Elevation: 60 to 2137 m

Precipitation:

Description: Marojejy is one of Madagascar's most biodiverse protected areas due to habitats that span a range of altitudes.

FAUNA
Birds: 116
Reptiles: 49
Frogs: 60
Mammals: 47
   Lemurs: 12
Lemur species:

FLORA:
Marojejy's range of elevations results in variable vegetation zones ranging from lowland rainforest, montane rainforest, high mountain sclerophyllous forest, to high elevation moorland-like vegetation (above the tree-line).

ANGAP describes 5 types of forests for Marojejy:
  • Low altitude rainforest (below 800 m): present in some steepsided valleys, but generally degraded. Closed canop of 25 - 30m is closed height. Many epiphytes and palms.
  • Low altitude secondary forest (below 800 m): characterized by Arongana (Aroga madagascariensis), bamboo (Oclandra capitata), ravenala palms (Ravenala madagascariensis), and/or wild gingembres (Afromum sp.).
  • Montane forest (800-1450 m): closed canopy of 18-25 m. Abundant epiphytes (especially ferms), mosses and lichens.
  • Sclerophyllous forest (1400-1800 m): characterized by rapid changes in temperature and humidity. 10 m canopy. The ground is covered with a thick layer of mosses and lichens.. Shrubby 1 m tall bamboos are found here.
  • Moorland mountain thicket vegetation (1800m +): exposed rock, peat bogs, and grassy vegetation. In this zone you can find ptéridophytes and small palm trees.
    Species:

    Dominant ethnic group(s): Tsimihety

    Official web page

    Additional notes: More than 50 species of palm trees are found in Marojejy.Marojejy

    MAP/Satellite Picture

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    Pictures on this site were taken with a Konica Minolta




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