Andringitra

With its dramatic peaks, waterfalls, and unusual landscape, Andringitra is often called Madagascar's most scenic national park. Andringitra is also known for its biodiversity, including 78 species of amphibians, 50 species of reptiles, 54 species of mammals, 108 species of birds, and more than 1,000 species of plants.

Several operators offer camping tours in the park. Be prepared for long hikes and cold temperatures, especially at night.

Province: Fianarantsoa

Area: 31,160

Protected area status: National park

Year established: 1999

General location:

Location and Access: 47 km south of Ambalavao, 120 km south of Ranomafana

Climate: Wet tropical to montane forest to high altitude vegetation

Average temperature: 10-25°C*

Elevation: 650 to 2658 m

Precipitation: 130-400 cm*

Description: Andringitra is characterized by high mountains (peak 2658m), deep valleys, and ridges. Andringitra, one of the most biodiverse parks in Madagascar, is made up of three distinct ecozones: 1) low altitude rainforest, 2) montane mountain, and 3) highland vegetation/forest.

FAUNA
Birds: 106
Reptiles: 34
Frogs: 55
Mammals: 54
   Lemurs: 13
   Rodents: 11
   Insectivores: 16
   Bats: 11
Crustaceans (Crayfish): 7
Lemur species:

FLORA:
Elevation 650-800 m: Wet tropical forest with canopy of 25-30 m and dominated by Canarium madagascariense (Burseraceae) and Sloanea rhodantha (Elaeocarpaceae).
Elevation 1000 and 1200 m: transition zone between low altitude forest and montane forest (characterized by the presence of Podocarpus madagascariensis).
Elevation 1200-1625 m: Montane sclerophyllous forest characterized by 5-10 m canopy and an abundance of foams and lichens. Thickets of bamboos, Arundinaria and Nastus, along with Podocarpus madagascariensis (Podocarpaceae), Weinmannia (Cunoniaceae), Pandanus (Pandanaceae), and Symphonia (Clusiaceae) are found in this zone.
Higher elevation: Forests is replaced with a mosaic of stunted montane vegetation, lichens and rock exposures.
Families: 130
Species: 1057

Dominant ethnic group(s): Betsileo

Official web page

Additional notes: Due to its elevation, Andringitra climate is variable and between August and May, the temperatures can fill below 0ş.

Accomodation:

Tsara Camp
The Tsara Camp lies in the Tsaranoro Valley with the Tsaranoro Mountain (800m) on one side and the giant mountain chains of Andringitra National Park on the other side. Accommodation is provided in ten tents, each with two simple beds, bedside-table and possibility to hang up clothes.

MAP/Satellite Picture




Girl looking out a window of a hut in a village in the Tsaranoro Valley



Kids in an Antanifotsy Valley village



Kids in a Tsaranoro Valley village



Andringitra



Andringitra landscape



Rutted granite atop Andringitra's Chaine de Montagne Ampiadrianombilahy



White flower



Rock face of the Ampiadrianombilahy mountain chain



Andringitra camp site



Lizard



Girl in a Tsaranoro Valley village



Church in the Tsaranoro Valley



Creek and burned grass in Andringitra



Andringitra landscape



Girl in a Tsaranoro Valley village



Boy in the Antanifotsy Valley



Church in the Tsaranoro Valley



Rice fields in the Antanifotsy Valley



Grooved granite atop Andringitra's Chaine de Montagne Ampiadrianombilahy



Red-orange insect



Flowers



Andringitra sunset



Ferns illuminated in the late afternoon sun



Rice fields in the Antanifotsy Valley



Andringitra landscape



Yellow flowers emerging from charred earth



Antanifotsy Valley



Andringitra landscape



Carpet Chameleon (Furcifer lateralis)



Girl in a Tsaranoro Valley village



Yellow flowers emerging from charred earth



Ferns emerging from charred earth



Zebu cattle in Madagascar



Camping in the Antanifotsy Valley



Giant hissing cockroach pollinating a purple flower



White flower



Tsaranoro Valley



Cattle grazing on the edge of Andringitra



Tsaranoro Mountain



Girl in the Antanifotsy Valley



Blue dragonfly



Kids in an Antanifotsy Valley village



Kids in a Tsaranoro Valley village



Rice fields in the Antanifotsy Valley



Antanifotsy Valley



Flooded terraced rice fields in the Antanifotsy Valley



Andringitra landscape



Andringitra plant




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Pictures on this site were taken with a Konica Minolta




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Beautifully illustrated with full color photographs throughout, Madagascar Wildlife is a celebration of the unique fauna of a remarkable island and the perfect accompaniment to Bradt's popular general travel guide, Madagascar.


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